Jolly Kitty and a cat bell

Some time ago I started to upload designes to Zazzle in the hope to sell them from my Zazzle store. No sale still and the main reason is that Zazzle is a numbers game, the more products you have in you store the more likely it is to make a sale. Ofcourse quality also counts, but quality is time consuming. A bit of a “catch 22”, quality versus quantity. But I have to start somewhere and with practice comes perfection in my design. So my first new design is this the Jolly Kitty:

jolly kittyIt’s a cartoonish variation on the Jolly Roger. Whence Jolly Kitty. I think it’s a great idea but the execution isn’t all that good. One lesson I learned is that the black space between the white parts shouldn’t be so different in width. The stroke should be more harmoniously like in a proper cartoon, see f.i. the teeth and the space in between. It is too smallish compared to the rest, but for now I’ll leave it at that.

Therefor the next design is a bit different. I took a leaf from the pop art book and tried to make the strokes more harmoniously. I think it’s a big improvement compared with first one.kattebel
A thing to keep in mind with Zazzle is how best to apply your design on Zazzle products as efficiently as possible. F.i. create an image at least 1200 by 1200 pixels and allow it to be used for all sizes buttons. Also make a design for a square button (or magnet, or sticker etc.) seperately if the design demands it. The result is that you quickly have covered all sizes and shapes of a product.

Besides that, I always tailor-make a design to a product, may it be a hat, bag or mug. Creating a design in a vector program like Inkscape is a big plus in this case. A vector drawing can be scaled and modified quite easily without loss of quality. The downside is you have to learn such software, which isn’t everybodies cup of tea. At least I can have a bit of quantity withou sacrificing quality to much.